• An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow

 

Case studies

Case study 1

This particular horse was predisposed to ulcers and colic. The trainer saved him from dying. When we visited him he was debilitated, undernourished yet asking constantly for food. We found its issues to be obvious gut-related problems (leaky-gut). Two very specific makings: one in the abdominal wall and another in the liver gave us the clues. Impactions at time of spelling were suspected as the origin of the colic whilst the liver marking let us know that this horse should not be put to race long distances but rather short. This is because the gluconeogenesis would have been impeded in the liver during the transit from aerobic to anaerobic conditions.

 

Case study 2

This horse presented with obvious markings in the region of the spine: neck and lumbar back. As a matter of fact this horse had a higher croup than wither. It was becoming harder to achieve a good stride during the races. So far, the horse was kept in racing condition through regular chiropractic visits but they were becoming more and more frequent without stable results. We found the horse to have heavy metals in the samples we studied that explained why the chiropractic manipulation wasn’t holding anymore.


 

Case study 3

This is a polocrosse pony that we found to have severe chronic intestinal issues spreading to the rectum and scrotum. The owner after the assessment said that the horse has been scouring for the last month after being bought without a Vet check. In the paddock at the games we have not seen any loose stools, yet we were able to see how inflamed and raw the intestines were during a bowel motion. Therefore, we recommended a dietary change and treated the animal with natural supplements. The owner pointed that underneath the tail the horse presented with haemorrhoids. This validated our iridology findings.

 

Case study 4

This race horse was suffering from chronic daily coughing since she was given to the trainer. After several unsuccessful spelling sessions they took her to the Vet hospital for an endoscopy in order to find the reason for the cough. Nothing was found apart from the normal amount of mucous behind the throat. After our iridology assessment we found the intestines to be the primary area of concern. Eventhough she is regularly de-wormed and drenched there seems to be an underlying constitutional predisposition to getting used to the medication. Our remedy consisted of natural adjuvant parasitic and worming homeopathic given daily for 30 days that managed to cease the coughing.

 

Case study 5

When we saw this horse at the races it was running 1550 metres yet not firing and thus arriving last. I was called to analyse her 30 minutes after her run to find out that she was still puffing. I also analysed her walking with the trainer after the race together with her iris and urine for heavy metals. Her iris showed an extremely good constitution yet most of the information was gathered from the sclera (white part of the eye), gait, behaviour and  urine analysis. Treatment with nutritionals started within a few days. Two weeks later, she run again in 1400 metres. Firing took place earlier in the race making her come in second place close distance to the runner up. Recovery time took place within ten minutes after running and there was no puffing. We look forward to seeing more of her winning.